Thoughts on Dress | Vol. 1

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Hello my dears! Lately my views on how we dress and what we wear have been morphing and changing. A lot of questions have come into my head, and some interesting theories as well. I thought it would be interesting to share a few of these musings with you all, so I am beginning a series called Thoughts on Dress. I not only want to share my thoughts with you all, but I want to hear your thoughts on the questions/theories/ideas I present in these posts.

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I have always had an “odd” view of clothes. After all, I design and make my own garments. How can a designer not have their own, odd, view of the world they want to create? I believe that clothes are an outward expression of who we are, our personality, who God has made us to be. When we wear a certain outfit, it expresses a message to the world, whether that message is “I don’t care about how I look, I just want to be comfortable,” or “I don’t care what the world thinks about me, I want to look nice and presentable.” When we embrace our femininity, by wearing clothing that makes us look like what we are, women, created in the image of God, we are sending a message to the world that we delight in being what we were created to be. Feminine dress doesn’t mean ruffles, bows, pastels, and fru-fru styles. It can mean that, but it isn’t just that one thing. Feminine dress makes you look like what you are: A woman. An outfit can be dull in color and completely devoid of decoration, but it can still be feminine. Because dress isn’t just about our clothes, it includes hair, shoes, and accessories.

I want my clothes to communicate who I am: I am a creative person; that means my clothes will reflect that. I am a woman, and I delight in that fact; that means they will be feminine. I want to look nice all the time, while still being dressed practically; that means there won’t be much difference between my wardrobe and the average woman’s “Church” outfit. I love history; that means my clothes will look different from what the average woman on the street is wearing today. What I wear will communicate these messages. It won’t always communicate ALL of these messages, because I think what we wear is a work in progress. But if I can communicate to the people around me that I am different, that I believe there is something more to life than just living, without uttering a single word, then I have achieved something. We can trigger questions by what we wear, and sometimes those questions end up starting the most important conversations a person might ever have in their life.

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So, my question for you is:

What message is your clothing sending the world around you?

Blessings,

Brigid E.

P.S. The images above are in progress shots of a Regency Dress that I made recently. I will post more about it soon! Once I get some decent photographs.

P.P.S. My blog is now on Bloglovin’, which means you can click the following link to…Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Author and Photographer: Brigid Everson
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10 thoughts on “Thoughts on Dress | Vol. 1

  1. First of all, thank you for this post! It gives me really something to think about!! ❤

    For me, I am a Christian, almost teenager girl, and I dress very modestly and generally pretty nicely too. I dress for Him, and I want people to realize that I am not self-absorbed, and serve Him, and through my clothing I like to give the message that I:

    ~Want to represent Christian girls like myself
    ~Want to be comfortable and not wonder what people are thinking of me
    ~ Am a Christian, modestly dressed girl
    ~Cover up myself modestly, and don't wear the average girl's clothing
    ~I wear unique pieces that give people my sense of personality and uniqueness 😉

    Hadassah ❤

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  2. I always try to dress feminine. I love wearing the color pink, though many women would not be caught dead with pink clothing. I look forward to seeing photos of the Regency dress.
    Marilyn

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  3. I didn’t understand anything about fashion until I was an adult. I was uncomfortable and embarrassed about my wardrobe during my teenage years. I still don’t have it down, but I’m working on it. My most recent discovery is that I want to be comfortable; that is hugely important. Sometimes we get the idea that is pretty vs. comfortable, but I want to get my wardrobe to the point that it is both.

    I love the photos, the pretty colors and florals of the quilt, your embroidery, and the dress.

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  4. Wow, so true Brijee! So many girls think that clothing don’t really show who we are on the inside, but they really do!!! I love your style, and I am looking forward to many more awesome posts!!!

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  5. Love your thoughts on this topic! I hope my clothes convey femininity, a little whimsy, with a “classic” look to them. But you do have me thinking, maybe I should do a once-over of my closet!

    Your post reminded me a little bit of the book The Lost Art of Dress: The Women Who Once Made America Stylish by Linda Przybyszewski. I read it last year and found it absolutely delightful!

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    1. Oh, thank you for that sweet compliment, Aliciamae! I have yet to read Linda Przybyszewki’s book, but SO want too! She was one of my inspirations in studying how to dress.

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  6. I love to theorize about fashion too, although most would qualify my style as rather “plain”. I love well-fitted, quality garments that are feminine, mostly dresses in muted colors, and easy updos for my long hair. I want to convey the message that I didn’t spend hours in the bathroom getting ready, but that I embrace my femininity and I’m clean and presentable in all circumstances. Like you, I don’t distinguish every day clothes from my Sunday best. My husband often says he fell in love with my “effortless beauty” which is quite the compliment in my eyes. However, some ladies at my church have an amazing sense of style and wear “statement pieces” very well – it’s not for me but I genuinely think it’s great for them, as a way to express creativity and personality.

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